USEFUL LINKS

This page is still under development, with future useful links to follow in the future.  Please especially try out the musical links with your children, as I have a special interest in encouraging more exposure to good music for kids.

http://cdc.govThe CDC, Centers for Disease Control, is a federal website which offers detailed information on such subject  as infectious diseases, immunizations, environmental issues,  emergency preparedness, travel, and numerous other subjects.

Here are a few useful sites on the correct use of auto restraints:

http://www.seatcheck.org

http://www.nhtsa.gov/cps/cpsfitting/index.cfm

http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/welcome/safety/car_seats_safety

http://www.healthychildren.org/English/Pages/default.aspxThis is a portion of the AAP specifically designed to educate parents in a  wide variety of highly reliable information.

http://www.healthychildren.org/English/tips-tools/Symptom-Checker/Pages/default.aspxThis new and very useful, user-friendly guide specifically devoted to  pediatric symptoms and how parents should approach children who display them.

http://www.healthychildren.org/english/health-issues/conditions/Pages/default.aspx

http://www.drgreene.com :     Now about fifteen years old, this is probably the most comprehensive, useful, and elegant pediatric site around ( other that perhaps  than the AAP’s  own site).

http://scientificsonline.com Edmund Scientifics is  an excellent source of science toys, projects, and scientific items of every description, that has been around long enough that I ordered from it as a child.

http://larkinthemorning.com: Lark In the Morning is a delightful company and site that offers an anormous array of musical instruments, conventional and unusual, from around the world.  It also offers books and sheet music.

http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov A website of extensive information about basic genetics and genetic diseases created by the National Institues of Health.  It represents a partnership of numerous governmental agencies and medical specialty associations.

SOME NICE MUSICAL LINKS FOR YOUNGSTERS AND THEIR PARENTS–HAVE A LOOK AND A LISTEN:

http://www.thirteen.org/publicarts/orchestra/orchestra03.swf Something different: a nice orchestral instrument recognition quiz.  Try this on your children.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0REJ-lCGiKU Youtube is stuffed with cute kid items, but this one, from a choral conducting society website with a three year-old living room conductor really stands out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1GuPhZRR-E&feature=related A delightful duet by the world’s premier recorder player and flautist  (M. Petri/J. Galway)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvNQLJ1_HQ0 A nice, warm recording of the maybe overpopularized Pachelbel “Canon”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3uh75-OXQo And another “Canon” recording, this one with an engaging visual diagram parallelling the music.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SSCxJdHeKY Something highly amusing from the world of opera:  a choral ensemble scene from Verdi’s “La Traviata,”  with some very skillful and imaginative animation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pR8ABKpwm7w Some very fast and exciting fiddling from Izhak Perlman, who seems to be enjoying every minute of it.  The showpiece is Dance of the Goblins by a composer named Bazzini.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PRIiYnzLB0 From Perlman to a young trumpet player named Venessa Vedrema.  This piece seems to be a variation on the “Taps,”  but it’s beautiful playing in a nice setting.  I think it’s motivating  for kids to see talented young musicians like this.  Seems to be a Andre Rieu program.  Disclaimer: some of the language in the comments.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRpzxKsSEZg Here is an nice outdoor European performance of  “In the Hall of the Mountain King,” from Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt.   One of the best known and very accessible short pieces for children.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08zd3hI87bc Scotland and Ireland are well-know for their fiddle music tradition.  Here is the best known contemporary Scottish fidder, Alisdair Fraser  and his frequent cellist collaborator, Natalie Haas in music whose name would be familiar to only very few Scottish fiddle experts, but whose movement is accessible to anyone older than four months.