Classical Clip of the Week

When I was an elementary school student in HISD (Houston Independent School District) a rather long time ago, music appreciation was taught as a weekly course, teaching us many numerous classic composers and compositions. All elementary schools (much smaller number in those days) were treated to a couple of full Houston Symphony full student concerts at the then Music Hall. This implanted in many students, certainly myself included, a life-long love and appreciation for classical music, which has been truly life enriching. Unfortunately, budget cuts and other curriculum priorities eliminated such courses in public schools over the years, and for most children and many of their parents, not being exposed to this sort of music much, or at all, never even have an opportunity to “try it out.” 

In a bit of an effort to at least offer a little exposure, I decided to put on my practice website a page called “Classical Clips of the Week.” At that or at least regular intervals I hope, G-d willing, to feature a short clip from the vast collection of YouTube musical video concerts, of a variety of orchestral and other musical highlights. There will be a short introductory note, and a suggested start-stop timing indicator, which can obviously be extended in both directions. I hope this will provide some musical enjoyment and education to kids and caretakers, and maybe even produce some true music lovers. I would strongly suggest that, if possible, they be listened to with either good computer (or larger) speakers, or good earphones or headphones, as phone or laptop speakers just cannot reproduce orchestral music adequately. And a decent display is better than a little phone screen. It is worth noting that, more than ever before, YouTube and other music sites offer unlimited access to an enormous range of the five or so centuries of classical music. Give it a try. See what you think. 

Dr. Cotlar

Beethoven Violin Concerto from 1806. (34:10 to 41:10) though you might want to stay until the end.) The solo violinist, a younger Izhak Perlman, often has a particularly happy look when he plays. He had polio as a child, which you can notice only when he stands up at the end.


Peter and the Wolf (Sergei Prokofiev)

This 30 minute piece was written as “a symphonic fairy tale for children” in 1936 in Russia. It is probably the most famous and most frequently performed classical music written specifically for kids. The composer tells a rather simple story, using different instruments to represent each of the characters in the story. Video performances often use cartoon or other visual characters, but I like this version, in which the conductor himself tells the story with his own animated movements and expressions. Although it is half an hour long, I am not specifying a particular segment because it tells a whole sotry and the music develops with the story.

A LITTLE BASKET OF CONCERTOS

One of the most important forms of orchestral music is the concerto (pronounced con-cher’-toe), which is a team effort between orchestra (small or large) and one or more solo instruments. A concerto is a little like a conversation or a tennis game, with the orchestra and soloist(s) taking turns and playing together. There are thousands of them, starting in about the 1600’s and still being composed today. There are concertos for just about every instrument as soloist, though the piano and violin are the most common. There are often three sections, called movements, often fast, slow, fast, though this can vary a lot. The soloist must be an exceptionally fine musician (and often plays an especially fine instrument which is heard over the whole orchestra.)

Beethoven: Piano Concerto #5, Emperor Concerto. More great Beethoven, 1810 (4:50 until 9:15). On the longer pieces this just suggests a reasonable length segment for most children.

Not quite so famous, but two nice examples of brass concertos, two earlier pieces, with the smaller orchestras which were more common at that time:

Haydn: Trumpet Concerto, third movement (full selection). 1796. The soloist is the great trumpet player Wynton Marsalis, who is famous for playing all kinds of music with great virtuosity.

Mozart Horn Concerto #4 (13:50 until end) from 1786.


TURKISH MARCH BY MOZART & TURKISH MARCH BY BEETHOVEN
7/24/2020
There are at least two famous short works that carry the name, “Turkish March.”  One of these is by Mozart (about 1827) and the other by Beethoven (about 1808).  They both have the rhythm of marches that were played by Turkish army bands and also have some of the same instrument sounds (although these are played by orchestra, which has more instruments than a military band.)  But two fun pieces, and look at those period uniforms of the players in the first orchestra

Here is the one by Mozart:

And here is the one by Beethoven:


 THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER (music by John Stafford Smith, England) 1700s 

7/10/2020

Most symphony orchestras begin their season by playing the national anthem as first piece at the first concert. So we will start this collection the same way. Although just about every American and countless other people around the world are familiar with the anthem, most have not heard it in full orchestration at its normal tempo (speed) and with full orchestra. Rather more are used to pre-sports performances with popular singers offering individual styles, which change the tempo and other aspects of the music. Here is a traditional rendition played by the New York Philharmonic and chorus. You will see something very unusual: three different conductors, as this somehow combine performances in three different years.


THE WILLIAM TELL OVERTURE (Giacamo Rossini: 1829))—start about 8:20 to end of piece)

7/10/2020

An overture is a section of music that comes before the main program, in this case an opera that is seldom performed anymore. The overture, especially the last three or so minutes, however, is very familiar to most people because it is used in so many popular ways. It became really, really famous because it was the theme music to a radio then television cowboy show (there used to be a lot of those) called “The Lone Ranger”—who wore a mask all the time, by the way. It was later used in cartoons, commercials, and lots of other things like that. Watch all the instruments taking turns playing the main theme. Close your eyes and use your imagination to think what picture or story this music makes you think of.


THE TYPEWRITER (Leroy Anderson: 1950)—whole piece

7/10/2020

Leroy Anderson was known for light, short orchestral pieces, such the “The Syncopated Clock.” This is also one of is best know, and “cutest” I guess we could say. A lot of kids might not even know what a typewriter is, but before computers, printers, and software, these machines—first mechanical, later electric—were used to type instead of hand write documents. Ask your parents to tell you about them, and they may even have one to show you. In this piece, an actual typewriter is one of the “instruments” in the orchestra, and it has a very humorous affect.

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